Boston Homes
- Page 8
FOCUS ON BEACON HILL/WEST END (2)
Tide pools

A free summer program for children will be held at 4 p.m. on Thursday, Aug. 30 at Myrtle Street Playground, Myrtle and Irving streets. The rain location will be Hill House, 74 Joy St.

The New England Aquarium touch tank will visit the playground. The tide pools program allows children, ages 6 to 12, to handle and observe a wide range of tide pool animals from local waters and help kids build an understanding of habitats and adaptations.

For more information, visit www.myrtlestreetplayground.org.

Spray pool is open

The Frog Pond spray pool on Boston Common is open for the summer. Regular hours are from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. through Labor Day.

In addition, a carousel at the Frog Pond is open daily from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. The hours are extended until 8 p.m. on Fridays and Saturdays.

Call 617-635-2120 or visit www.bostonfrogpond.com for more information.

Swan boats summer hours

The famous swan boats have returned to the Public Gardens. Summer hours of operation (now through Labor Day) are from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. seven days a week, weather permitting.

Established in 1877, the swan boats are a family-owned and -operated business with a unique tradition and place in the history and beauty of the city. A ride on a swan boat lasts about 15 minutes and provides a picturesque voyage on the waters of the lagoon.

Tickets are $3 or $2 for seniors and $1.50 for children. For more information, call 617-522- 1966 or visit www.swanboats.com.

Coloring for adults

“Color Your World,” coloring for adults, will be held from 2 to 3 p.m. on Fridays at the West End Branch Library, 151 Cambridge St.

Studies have shown the relaxing benefits of coloring for adults as well as children. Patrons are invited to drop in and enjoy a relaxing afternoon coloring. Coloring pages, pencils, crayons and markers will be provided.

For more details, call 617-523-3957.

Picturing Douglass

The Museum of African American History is presenting a new public exhibition “Picturing Frederick Douglass” at the African Meeting House, 46 Joy St., now through December.

Douglass was the most photographed American of the 19th century, more frequently photographed than Abraham Lincoln, and was immediately recognizable to millions in his own lifetime. Douglass used photography as a tool of reform and to elevate the image of the African-American in contradiction to the demeaning depictions of black life often seen in the 19th century.

Based on the book of the same name by Drs. John Stauffer and Zoe Trodd, co-curators of the exhibit, it features more than 90 objects, including historic photos, books, newspapers articles and original letters by Douglass.

Further information can be found by calling 617-725-0022, ext. 222 or online at www.maah.org.